6-8 Korean War Legacy Project

Korean War and Sacrifice

This inquiry leads students through an investigation of individual and group sacrifices made during times of conflict and war. By investigating the compelling question, “What does it mean to sacrifice?,” students evaluate the historical significance of individuals and groups during the Korean War. The formative performance tasks build on knowledge and skills through the course of the inquiry and help students to understand the sacrifices made by soldiers and civilians on both sides during the Korean War. Students create an evidence-based argument about the sacrifice of all in times of conflict and war.

Download

Compelling Question:

What Does It Mean to Sacrifice?

Staging the Question:


Discuss the historical significance of individual and group sacrifice in times of conflict and war.
1

Supporting Question How did soldiers sacrifice during the war?

Formative Task Make a list of examples of the sacrifices of soldiers in the Korean War.

Sources Source A: Chapter from the Korean War Legacy Project, “POW Experience”
Source B: Personal narrative by Bob Mitchell, a Marine Corps veteran, on his extensive front-line combat experience
Source C: Personal narrative by Fred Liddell, Korean War veteran, on his capture by Chinese troops in 1951
Source D: Link to the Korean War Legacy Project’s Memory Bank to search for other veteran interviews describing soldiers’ sacrifices

2

Supporting Question How did Koreans sacrifice during the war?

Formative Task Write a paragraph about the sacrifices of Koreans in the Korean War.

Sources Source A: Chapter from the Korean War Legacy Project, “The Human Experience”

Source B: Personal narrative of Donald J. Zoeller, 140th Anti-Aircraft Battalion, on his experiences near the main line of resistance (MLR)

Source C: Personal narrative of Clarence Jerke, 2nd Infantry Division Headquarters Battery, on his work maintaining communications lines behind enemy lines

Source D: Additional photographs from the war

Summative Performance Task

Argument: “What does it mean to sacrifice?” Construct an argument (e.g., detailed outline, poster, or essay) that discusses the compelling question using specific claims and relevant evidence from the sources provided, as well as one other source, while acknowledging competing views.
Extension: Using the argument as a foundation, engage in small-group brainstorming to create an original poem or song responding to the compelling question, “What does it mean to sacrifice?”

Taking Informed Action

Understand: Examine the historical significance of sacrifices made by individuals and groups during a current or recent conflict or war.
Assess: Determine some ways the stories of soldiers fighting abroad might be shared in the community.
Act: Organize a school- or community-wide effort to share poems or songs of appreciation from students with local veterans’ associations.