9-12

2020 Protest

This inquiry leads students through a comparison of protest marches. The compelling question for this inquiry calls on students to examine primary source photographs of protest marches that attempt to restrict the rights of citizens and protest marches that attempt to protect civil rights.  By completing this inquiry, students begin to understand the similarities and differences between historic and contemporary protest marches.

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Compelling Question:

Is There Anything New about the 2020 Protests?

Staging the Question:


Examine images of a local (or nearby) protest from 2020 and generate a list of things you know about the protests and questions you would like answered.
1

Supporting Question What are similarities and differences between historic and modern marches that aimed to restrict the rights of citizens?

Formative Task Create a Venn diagram comparing the similarities and differences between historic and modern marches that aimed to restrict the rights of citizens.

Sources Source A: 1925 KKK March in Washington, D.C. Image Set
Source B: 2017 Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, Virginia Image Set

2

Supporting Question What are similarities and differences between historic and modern protests demanding civil rights?

Formative Task Create a Venn diagram comparing the similarities and differences between historic and modern protests demanding civil rights.

Sources Source A: 2020 Black Lives Matter Marches Image Set from the New York Times
Source B: 1917 New York Silent Parade Image Set
Source C: 1965 March on Selma Image Set
Source D: 1995 Million Man March, Washington, D.C. Image Set
Source E: 2014 Ferguson, Missouri Protests Image Set

Summative Performance Task

Argument: Is there anything new about the 2020 protests? Construct a claim supported with evidence that answers the compelling question.

Taking Informed Action

Understand: Embedded with the formative tasks
Assess: Ask an adult if they have participated in a protest before and explain why/why not and whether it made a difference.
Act: Participate in a classroom discussion about why people they know have protested and whether it’s an effective form of resistance.